People are losing their jobs. Businesses are closing. The stock market is tanking. The coronavirus crisis is taking a toll on people's bank accounts and their health.

If you or someone you know is suffering financially due to the coronavirus outbreak and having a hard time paying for a pet's veterinarian bill Waggle.org can help.

Waggle.org is a new site (www.waggle.org) with one goal: ending economic euthanasia.

Case in point: the timing could not have been worse for Susan and her family. Susan lost her job working as a food server during the coronavirus outbreak.

Then she found out her beloved dog, Zeus needs immediate surgery, but without income, she can’t afford to pay the bill.

Panicked, Susan turned to Waggle which offers a unique way to crowdsource expensive vet bills. She is currently trying to raise the money.

Ending Economic Euthanasia

When pet owners, shelters, or rescue groups can't afford an animals' medical care, sometimes they end up having to put the pet to sleep. Waggle estimates about a half-million animals are euthanized each year because of financial constraints.

Some pet owners say it's one of the worst moments they've ever experienced: They rush their treasured dog or cat to the animal hospital to find their best friend needs thousands of dollars in veterinary care to stay alive. With treatment, the prognosis is excellent for their pet, the problem is, they can't afford the bill.

This situation could happen to anyone of us at any time.

How It Works

Waggle offers pet owners, rescue groups, and shelters in need a policed, contemporary, and smart way to crowdfund an animal's medical bill.

The company makes sure the money raised goes straight to the veterinarian or animal hospital. Waggle requires pet owners to send in multiple pictures of their pets, their animal hospital's contact information, and the actual estimate for their care.

Then Waggle allows the owner to create a fundraising page on the company's website for free. They can raise up to $5,000 through Waggle's site to help pay for their animal's vet bill. The campaigns also depend on pet owners sharing the links and letting people know about the hardship they're facing.

The pet owner never receives any of the money raised. That helps eliminate doubts about fake fundraising campaigns.

The company's founder and CEO, Steven Mornelli, calls it an innovative solution for saving beloved pets. "Waggle is a trustworthy means to help families who have lost hope. We provide a trusted solution," he said.

Waggle's nonprofit arm works with charitable foundations that donate toward some campaigns, and also works with influencers, like Lil Bub, who sponsored and helped spread the word about Pepper's urgent medical needs. Greatergood.org stepped in to make sure Lulu got her surgery.

And It Does Work

Darka, from Portland, Oregon, is so grateful to Waggle. Recently when work was slow and her bank account was bleak, her beloved dog Lulu needed $1500 in surgery. Without the operation, Lulu's future was grim.

And Willa, who lives outside Iowa City, Iowa, said Waggle helped save her kitten's life. Soon after Willa rescued Pepper, the cat needed a costly $2000 MRI scan. Without it, no one would know why Pepper suddenly could not walk.

Luckily both pet owners learned about Waggle.org, and now Lulu and Pepper are now living happily ever after. Their owners' credit Waggle and their caring veterinarians for saving them.

Waggle is currently seeking foundations, corporate sponsors and social influencers to work with to help even more pets in need.

Interviews

If you'd like to cover the Waggle.org revolution, we can make that happen!

Waggle can arrange on camera, Skype, Facetime, and phone interviews any of the pet owners mentioned above and Mornelli, just email: press@waggle.org or call (860) 532-0203.